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[edit] vaseline

VASS-uh-leen

noun

Etymology

1872, from Vaseline, the trademark for an ointment made from petroleum and marketed by Chesebrough Manufacturing Co., coined from German Wasser "water" + Greek elaion "oil" + scientific-sounded ending -ine. Robert A. Chesebrough was of the opinion that petroleum was a product of the underground decomposition of water. [1]

Definition

petroleum jelly [2]


[edit] vaudeville

VAUD-vill

noun

Etymology

from Middle French, popular satirical song, alteration of vaudevire, from vau-de-Vire valley of Vire, town in northwest France where such songs were composed. [3]

Definition
  1. light often comic theatrical piece frequently combining pantomime, dialogue, dancing, and song
  2. stage entertainment consisting of various acts (as performing animals, comedians, or singers) [4]


[edit] venereal

Etymology

from Latin venereus, venerius, from Venus, the goddess of love [5]

Definition
  1. of or pertaining to venery, or sexual love
  2. relating to sexual intercourse
  3. arising from sexual intercourse [6]


[edit] verdigris

VER-duh-greess

noun

Etymology

from vert de Grece, the Anglo-French phrase. The word "verdigris" has been associated with statuary and architecture, ancient and modern, since it was first used in the 14th century. [7]

Definition

a green or bluish deposit especially of copper carbonates formed on copper, brass, or bronze surfaces [8]


[edit] vulcanize

VUL-kuh-nyze

verb

Etymology

from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and of skills that used fire, such as metalworking. Vulcanization involves heating rubber in combination with sulfur. When Charles Goodyear discovered that high heat would result in stronger rubber, he called the process "vulcanization" after the god of fire. Goodyear stumbled upon the idea in 1839 and acquired a patent for it in 1844, but the labels "vulcanize" and "vulcanization" didn't appear in print until 1846. [9]

Definition

to treat rubber or rubberlike material chemically to give useful properties (as elasticity or strength) [10]

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