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[edit] tantalize

TAN-tuh-lyze

verb

Etymology

1597, from Greek Tantalos, king of Phrygia, son of Zeus, punished in the afterlife (for an offense variously given) by being made to stand in a river up to his chin, under branches laden with fruit, all of which withdrew from his reach whenever he tried to eat or drink. [1]

Definition
  1. to tease or torment by or as if by presenting something desirable to the view but continually keeping it out of reach
  2. to cause one to be tantalized [2]


[edit] tarmac

TAR-mack

noun, verb

Etymology

1903, from Tarmac as a trademark name, short for tarmacadam from tar + John L. McAdam (see macadam). [3]

Definition
  1. a tarmacadam road or surface, especially an airport runway
  2. to cause (an aircraft) to sit on a taxiway
  3. to sit on a taxiway [4]


[edit] tarantism

TEAR-un-TIZ-um

noun

Etymology

from Taranto, the name of a city in southern Italy where the dance from, tarantella, was popular. [5]

Definition

a disorder characterized by an uncontrollable urge to dance, especially prevalent in southern Italy from the 15th to the 17th century and popularly attributed to the bite of a tarantula. [6]


[edit] tartar

TAR-ter

noun

Etymology

c. 1369 from Persian Tatar, first used in the 13th century in reference to the hordes of Ghengis Khan (1202-1227), said to be from Tata, a name of the Mongols for themselves [7]

Defintion
  1. a substance consisting essentially of cream of tartar that is derived from the juice of grapes and deposited in wine casks together with yeast and other suspended matters as a pale or dark reddish crust or sediment; especially
  2. a recrystallized product yielding cream of tartar on further purification
  3. an incrustation on the teeth consisting of plaque that has become hardened by the deposition of mineral salts (as calcium carbonate)
  4. a person of irritable or violent temper
  5. one that proves to be unexpectedly formidable [8]


[edit] tawdry

TAW-dree

adjective

Etymology

In the 7th century, Etheldreda, the queen of Northumbria, renounced her husband and her royal position for the veil of a nun. She was renowned for her saintliness and is traditionally said to have died of a swelling in her throat, which she took as a judgment upon her fondness for wearing necklaces in her youth. Her shrine became a principal site of pilgrimage in England. An annual fair was held in her honor on October 17th, and her name became simplified to Saint Audrey. At these fairs various kinds of cheap knickknacks were sold, along with a type of necklace called "St. Audrey's lace," which by the 17th century had become altered to "tawdry lace." [9]

Definition
  1. cheap and gaudy in appearance or quality
  2. ignoble [10]


[edit] tequila

tu-KEE-lu

Etymology

Spanish, from Tequila, town in Jalisco state, Mexico, 1849

Definition

a Mexican liquor distilled from the fermented sap of an agave (Agave tequilana)[11]


[edit] terpsichorean

terp-sih-kuh-REE-un

adjective

Etymology

In Greek and Roman mythology, Terpsichore was one of the nine muses, those graceful sister-goddesses who presided over learning and the arts. Terpsichore was the patron of dance and choral song (and later lyric poetry), and in artistic representations she is often shown dancing and holding a lyre. [12]

Definition

of or relating to dancing [13]


[edit] tesla

TESS-luh

noun

Etymology

Nikola Tesla (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was an inventor, physicist, mechanical and electrical engineer. Born in Smiljan, Croatian Krajina, Austrian Empire, he was an ethnic Serb subject of the Austrian Empire and later became an American citizen. Tesla is best known for many revolutionary contributions in the field of electricity and magnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [14]

Definition

a unit of magnetic flux density in the meter-kilogram-second system equivalent to one weber per square meter [15]


[edit] theremin

THER-uh-min

noun

Etymology

after the Russian Léon Theremin who invented the instrument in 1919. The controlling section usually consists of two metal antennae which sense the position of the player's hands and control radio frequency oscillator(s) for frequency with one hand, and volume with the other. The electric signals from the theremin are amplified and sent to a loudspeaker. [16]

Definition

a purely melodic electronic musical instrument typically played by moving the hands in the electromagnetic fields surrounding two projecting antennae [17]


[edit] timothy

TIH-muh-thee

noun

Etymology

first recorded 1747 as short for timothy grass (1736), a native British grass introduced to the American colonies and cultivated there from c.1720, said to be so called for Timothy Hanson, who was first to cultivate it as an agricultural plant. [18]

Definition

a European perennial grass (Phleum pratense) that has long cylindrical spikes and is widely grown for hay in the United States [19]


[edit] titanic

tie-TAN-ick

adjective

Etymology

In Greek religion and mythology the Titans—six sons and six daughters—were the children of Uranus and Gaea. They were Kronos, Iapetus, Hyperion, Oceanus, Coeus, Creus, Theia, Rhea, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, Tethys, and Themis. The name Titan was sometimes applied also to their descendants, such as Prometheus, Atlas, Hecate, Selene, and Helios. The Titans, led by Kronos, deposed their father and ruled the universe. They were in turn overthrown by the Olympians, led by Zeus, in the battle called the Titanomachy. Zeus freed from Tartarus the Cyclopes and the hundred-handed giants, the Hecatoncheires, to aid him in the war. The Cyclopes forged Hades' helmet of darkness, Poseidon's trident, and Zeus' thunderbolts. With these weapons Zeus and his brothers were able to defeat the Titans. After the struggle Zeus sent Kronos to rule the Isle of the Blessed and condemned Atlas to bear the sky on his shoulders. Prometheus (and, in some myths, Oceanus and Themis), because he sided with Zeus, was allowed to remain on Olympus, but all the other Titans were condemned to Tartarus. [20]

Definition
  1. having great magnitude, force, or power
  2. colossal [21]


[edit] tomboy

TOM-boy

noun

Etymology

1553, from Tom + boy [22]

Definition

a girl who behaves in a manner usually considered boyish [23]


[edit] trilby

TRILL-bee

noun

Etymology

1897, in allusion to Trilby O'Ferrall, eponymous heroine of the novel by George du Maurier (1834-96), published in 1894. In the stage version of the novel, the character wore this type of soft felt hat. [24]

Definition

a soft felt hat with indented crown (chiefly British) [25]


[edit] trojan

TROE-jun

noun

Etymology

of or pertaining to ancient Troy," from Latin Trojanus, from Greek Tros, name of a king of Phrygia, the mythical founder of Troy [26]

Definition

a person who shows pluck, determination, or energy [27]

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