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[edit] raglan

RAG-lun

adjective, noun

Etymology

after Fitzroy James Henry Somerset (1788–1855), First Baron Raglan, British field marshal [1]

Definition
  1. having or being a sleeve that extends in one piece to the neckline of the garment, with slanted seams from the armhole to the neck
  2. a garment, such as an overcoat or a sweater, that has raglan sleeves [2]


[edit] rhadamanthine

rad-uh-MEN-thin

adjective

Etymology

from Rhadamanthus, ruler and judge of the underworld in Greek mythology[3]

Definition

rigorously strict or just [4]


[edit] rocambolesque

roe-cam-boe-LESK

adjective

Etymology

from French rocambolesque, from Ponson du Terrail's character, Rocambole [5]

Definition
  1. fantastic
  2. incredible
  3. fabulous [6]


[edit] rodomontade

rah-duh-mun-TAYD

noun, adjective

Etymology

Rodomonte was a fierce and boastful king in Orlando Innamorato, Count Matteo M. Boiardo's late 15th century epic, and later in the sequel Orlando Furioso, written by poet Lodovico Ariosto in 1516. In the late 16th century, English speakers began to use rodomont as a noun meaning braggart. Soon afterwards, rodomontade entered the language as a noun (meaning "empty bluster" or "bragging speech") and later as an adjective (meaning "boastful" or "ranting") [7]

Definition
  1. a bragging speech
  2. vain boasting or bluster
  3. rant [8]


[edit] roentgen

RUNT-jun

noun

Etymology

from the German physicist Wilhem Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923), who discovered X-rays in 1895 [9]

Definition

a unit of radiation exposure equal to the quantity of ionizing radiation that will produce one electrostatic unit of electricity in one cubic centimeter of dry air at 0°C and standard atmospheric pressure [10]


[edit] romance

ROE-mans

noun; adjective

Etymology

c.1300, "story of a hero's adventures," also (c.1330), "vernacular language of France" (as opposed to Latin), originally an adverb, "in the vernacular language," from V.L. *romanice scribere "to write in a Romance language" (one developed from Latin instead of Frankish), from Latin Romanicus "of or in the Roman style.". The connecting notion is that medieval vernacular tales were usually about chivalric adventure. Literary sense extended by 1667 to "a love story." Extended 1612 to other modern languages derived from Latin (Spanish, Italian, etc.). Meaning "adventurous quality" first recorded 1801; that of "love affair, idealistic quality" is from 1916. The verb meaning "court as a lover" is from 1942. [11]

Definition
  1. a medieval tale based on legend, chivalric love and adventure, or the supernatural
  2. a prose narrative treating imaginary characters involved in events remote in time or place and usually heroic, adventurous, or mysterious
  3. a love story especially in the form of a novel b: a class of such literature
  4. something (as an extravagant story or account) that lacks basis in fact
  5. an emotional attraction or aura belonging to an especially heroic era, adventure, or activity
  6. love affair [12]


[edit] roorback

ROOR-back

noun

Etymology

In the midst of the 1844 presidential campaign between James K. Polk and Henry Clay, a letter was published in a newspaper in Ithaca, New York, claiming that a reputable witness (one Baron von Roorback) had, while traveling in Tennessee, come across 43 slaves owned by Polk and branded with his initials. The letter caused an uproar that threatened to derail Polk's campaign until it was discovered that the whole thing was a hoax supposedly perpetrated by the opposing party. Baron von Roorback didn't even exist. The incident proved a political boomerang; Polk won the election and the name "roorback" became a byword for political dirty tricks. [13]

Definition

a defamatory falsehood published for political effect [14]


[edit] roscoe

ROSS-coe

noun

Etrymology

from the name Roscoe [15]

Definition

a handgun (slang) [16]


[edit] rotisserie

roh-TIH-suh-ree

adjective

Etymology

first invented in 1979 by publishing consultant Daniel Okrent, rotisserie baseball allows fans a way to follow their pastime interactively by compiling teams of real-life players and rating the success of their team based on those players. We can attribute this new sense of the word "rotisserie" to La Rotisserie Francaise, the now-defunct Manhattan restaurant where Okrent and his fellow rotisserie buffs first gathered to perfect the rules of the game and to compare statistics. Variations of the game have since spread to a number of other major sports (including football and basketball), and the word "rotisserie" is applied to these games as well. [17]

Definition

of, relating to, or being a sports league consisting of imaginary teams whose performance is based on the statistics of actual players [18]

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