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[edit] jabberwocky

JAB-er-wah-kee

noun

Etymology

1872, nonsense word (perhaps based on jabber) coined by Lewis Carroll, for the poem of the same name, which he published in Through the Looking-Glass. The poem is about a fabulous beast called the Jabberwock. [1]

A portion of the poem appears below
"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!" [2]

Definition

nonsensical speech or writing [3]


[edit] jackanapes

JACK-uh-napes

noun

Etymology

c.1449, apparently from Jack of Naples, but whether this is some specific personification or folk etymology of jack + ape is unknown [4]

Definition
  1. an impertinent person
  2. a tame monkey (archaic) [5]


[edit] jacquard

/ˈjaˌkärd, jəˈkärd/

noun

Etymology

early 19th century: named after Joseph M. Jacquard (1787–1834), French weaver and inventor

Definition
  1. an apparatus with perforated cards , fitted to a loom to facilitate the weaving of figured and brocaded fabrics
  2. a fabric made on a loom with such a device, with an intricate variegated pattern[6]


[edit] jacuzzi

ja-KOO-zee

noun

Etymology

a trademark for a brand of whirlpool bathtubs. The Jacuzzi brothers manufactured a variety of products including a submersible agricultural pump. In 1955 the firm decided to market the Jacuzzi whirlpool bath as a therapeutic aid. [7]

Definition
  1. a whirlpool bath
  2. a recreational bathing tub or pool [8]


[edit] japan

juh-PAN

noun, verb

Etymology

Originating in India, China, and Japan as a decorative coating for pottery, it made its way into Europe by the 1600s. In the late 17th century, high European demand and rumors that higher quality pieces were not exported led to production starting in Italy. Its traditional form can be found using gold designs and pictorials contrasting with the black base color. [9]

Defintion
  1. a black enamel or lacquer used to produce a durable glossy finish
  2. an object decorated with this substance
  3. to decorate with a black enamel or lacquer
  4. to coat with a glossy finish
  5. a varnish yielding a hard, glossy film when baked at high temperature [10]


[edit] jehu

JEE-hyoo

noun

Etymology

1682, from Jehu, a king of Israel in the Old Testament, who "driveth furiously" (II Kings ix.20) [11]

Definition

a driver of a coach or cab [12]


[edit] jesuitical

jez-oo-IH-tih-kul

adjective, adverb

Etymology

1550, from Modern Latin Jesuita, member of the Society of Jesus, founded 1533 by Ignatius Loyola to combat Protestantism. Their enemies (in both Catholic and Protestant lands) accused them of belief that ends justify means, hence the sense "a dissembling person" (1640), and jesuitical "deceitful" (1613) [13]

Definition
  1. of or pertaining to the Jesuits, or to their principles and methods
  2. designing
  3. cunning
  4. deceitful
  5. crafty [14]


[edit] jeremiad

jer-uh-MY-ud

noun

Etymology

1780, from French jérémiade (1762), in allusion to "Lamentations of Jeremiah" in Old Testament [15]

Definition
  1. a prolonged lamentation or complaint
  2. a cautionary or angry harangue [16]


[edit] jeroboam

JER-uh-BOH-um

noun

Etymology

1816, from Jeroboam, "a mighty man of valour" (I Kings xi.28) "who made Israel to sin" (xiv.16), from Hebrew Yarobh'am, lit. "let the people increase." [17]

Definition

a large wine bottle holding four-fifths of a gallon [18]


[edit] jersey

JUR-zee

noun

Etymology

both from Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, said to be a corruption of Latin Caesarea, the Roman name for the island (or another near it), but probably in fact a Viking name (perhaps meaning "Geirr's island"). [19]

Definition
  1. a plain weft-knitted fabric made of wool, cotton, nylon, rayon, or silk and used especially for clothing
  2. any of various close-fitting usually circular-knitted garments especially for the upper body
  3. any of a breed of small short-horned predominantly yellowish brown or fawn dairy cattle noted for their rich milk [20]


[edit] jimmy

JIM-mee

noun, verb

Etymology

1848, variant of jemmy, special use of Jemmy, familiar form of proper name James [21]

Definition
  1. a short crowbar with curved ends
  2. to pry (something) open with or as if with a jimmy [22]


[edit] jingo

JIN-goh

interjection, noun

Etymology

1878, picked up from the refrain of a music hall song written by G.W. Hunt supporting aggressive British policy toward Russia at a time of international tension. ("We don't want to fight, But by Jingo! if we do, We've got the ships, we've got the men, We've got the money too.") As an asseveration, it was in colloquial use since 1694, and is apparently yet another euphemism for Jesus, influenced by conjurer's gibberish presto-jingo (1670). The suggestion that it somehow derives from Basque Jinko "god" is "not impossible," but "as yet unsupported by evidence" [OED]. [23]

Definition
  1. used as a mild oath usually in the phrase by jingo [24]
  2. mindless, gung-ho patriot [25]


[edit] john

JAHN

noun

Etymology

generic use of the proper name, John [26]

Definition
  1. a toilet or bathroom
  2. a fellow; guy
  3. a prostitute's customer [27]


[edit] johnnycake

JAHN-nee-cake

noun

Etymology

probably from the name Johnny [28]

Definition

bread made with cornmeal [29]


[edit] jones

JONEZ

noun

Etymology

1968, probably from the earlier use of Jones as a synonym for heroin, presumably from the proper name, but the connection, if any, is obscure [30]

Definition
  1. habit, addiction, especially addiction to heroin
  2. heroin
  3. an avid desire or appetite for something
  4. craving [31]


[edit] jovial

JOH-vee-ul

adjective

Etymology

1590, from Latin Jovialis "of Jupiter," from Jovius "Jupiter," Roman god of the sky. The meaning "good-humored, merry," is from astrological belief that those born under the sign of the planet Jupiter are of such dispositions. [32]

Definition

markedly good-humored especially as evidenced by jollity and conviviality [33]


[edit] juggernaut

JUG-er-nawt

noun

Etymology

In the early 14th century, Franciscan missionary Friar Odoric brought to Europe the story of an enormous carriage that carried an image of the Hindu god Vishnu (whose title was Jagannath, literally, "lord of the world") through the streets of India in religious processions. Odoric reported that some worshippers deliberately allowed themselves to be crushed beneath the vehicle's wheels as a sacrifice to Vishnu. That story was probably an exaggeration or misinterpretation of actual events, but it spread throughout Europe anyway. The tale caught the imagination of English listeners, and by the 19th century, they were using "juggernaut" to refer to any massive vehicle (such as a steam locomotive) or to any other enormous entity with powerful crushing capabilities. [34]

Definition
  1. a massive inexorable force, campaign, movement, or object that crushes whatever is in its path
  2. a large heavy truck (chiefly British) [35]


[edit] jumbo

JUM-boe

noun, adjective

Etymology

1883, from Jumbo, a huge elephant exhibited by P. T. Barnum [36]

Definition

a very large specimen of its kind [37]

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