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[edit] gadzooks

gad-ZOOKS

interjection

Etymology

1694, from some exclamation, possibly God's hooks (nails of the cross) or even God's hocks. The use of Gad for God (cf. egad) is first attested 1598. Among other similar phraseological combinations (all from 17c.) were gadsbobs, gadslid, and gadsniggers. [1]

Definition

an exclamation, used as a mild oath [2]


[edit] gadarene

GAD-uh-reen

adjective

Etymology

Gadara, in Biblical times, was a steep hill town just southeast of the Sea of Galilee. In the account given in the book of Matthew (8:28), Jesus, on a visit there, exorcised the demons from two possessed people and sent the demons into some nearby swine. The possessed swine ran in a mad dash down a steep bank into the Sea and drowned. [3]

Definition
  1. headlong
  2. precipitate [4]


[edit] gargantuan

gar-GAN-shuh-wun

adjective

Etymology

from Gargantua, large-mouthed giant in Rabelais' novel, Gargantua and Pantagruel (written 1532-1542), supposedly from Spanish/Portuguese garganta "gullet, throat," which is from the same imitative root as gargle. [5]. See also pantagruelian.

Definition
  1. tremendous in size, volume, or degree
  2. gigantic
  3. colossal [6]


[edit] gat

GAT

noun

Etymology

After the Gatling gun which had a high firing rate. The gun was designed by the American inventor Richard J. Gatling. Gatling's intent in inventing the gun was actually to save lives. He knew that in the American Civil war, many soldiers died simply from malnutrition. He thought that if he could make a gun that made one soldier as effective as many, armies could be much smaller. He felt that this would make it easier to supply armies with food. [7]

Definition
  1. short for Gatling gun
  2. handgun (slang) [8]


[edit] gauss

GOWSS

noun

Etymology

named for the Geman mathematician, Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855) [9]

Definition
  1. unit of intensity of a magnetic field [10]
  2. The centimeter-gram-second unit of magnetic flux density, equal to one maxwell per square centimeter. [11]


[edit] gerrymander

JER-ee-MAN-der

verb

Etymology

1812, from Elbridge Gerry + (sala)mander. Gerry, governor of Massachusetts, was lampooned when his party redistricted the state in a blatant bid to preserve an Antifederalist majority. One Essex County district resembled a salamander, and a newspaper editor dubbed it Gerrymander. [12]

Definition

to divide (an area) into election districts in a way that gives an unfair advantage to one group or political party [13]


[edit] golconda

gahl-KAHN-duh

noun

Etymology

Golconda is a ruined city of south-central India west of Hyderabad. Capital of an ancient kingdom (c. 1364-1512), it was later one of the five Muslim kingdoms of the Deccan until its capture by Aurangzeb's forces in 1687. Golconda was once known for the diamonds found nearby and cut in the city. [14]

Definition

a rich mine or other source of great wealth. [15]


[edit] goliath

guh-LIE-uth

noun

Etymology

from Hebrew Golyath, name of the Philistine giant killed by David in the book of Samuel in the Old Testament [16]

Definition

a very large and powerful person or organization [17]


[edit] google

GOO-gul

verb

Etymology

after Google, The World-Wide Web search engine that indexes the greatest number of web pages - over two billion by December 2001 and provides a free service that searches this index in less than a second. The site's name is apparently derived from "googol", but note the difference in spelling. The "Google" spelling is also used in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, in which one of Deep Thought's designers asks, "And are you not," said Fook, leaning anxiously foward, "a greater analyst than the Googleplex Star Thinker in the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity which can calculate the trajectory of every single dust particle throughout a five-week Dangrabad Beta sand blizzard?" [18]

Definition

to search for information on the Internet, especially using the Google search engine [19]


[edit] gorgonize

GOR-guh-nyze

verb

Etymology

In Greek mythology, the Gorgon was a vicious female monster with sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. Gorgons are sometimes depicted as having wings of gold, brazen claws, and the tusks of boars. According to the myths, seeing the face of a Gorgon turned the viewer to stone. [20]

Definition
  1. to have a paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on [21]
  2. to turn into stone; to paralyze with one's gaze [22]


[edit] gothic

GOTH-ick

adjective

Etymology

The Goths were a Germanic people who lived in Eastern Europe c. 100 A.D. Gothic was used by scholars to mean "Germanic, Teutonic" (1647), hence its evolution as a term for the art style that emerged in northern Europe in the Middle Ages, and the early 19c. literary style that used medieval settings to suggest horror and mystery. [23]

Definition
  1. of or related to the architectural style favored in western Europe in the 12th to 16th centuries
  2. of or related to the goth subculture or lifestyle
  3. of or related to a style of fictional writing emphasizing violent or macabre events in a mysterious, desolate setting
  4. of a style of elaborate calligraphy based on medieval writing, also called black letter [24]
  5. a style of music and the associated youth culture [25]


[edit] grinch

GRINCH

noun

Etymology

from the Grinch, character in the children's story How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1957) by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) [[26]]

Definition

killjoy, spoilsport [[27]]


[edit] gringo

GRING-go

noun

Etymology

from the Spanish word gringo meaning "foreign, unintelligible talk, gibberish," from griego, meaning Greek. The Diccionario Castellano (1787) says gringo was used in Malaga for "anyone who spoke Spanish badly," and in Madrid for "the Irish." [28]

Definition

a disparaging term for a foreigner in Latin America, especially an American or English person [29]


[edit] grog

GROWG

noun

Etymology

After Old Grog, nickname of Edward Vernon (1684–1757), British admiral who ordered that diluted rum be served to his sailors, from grogram (from his habit of wearing a grogram cloak). [30]

Definition

an alcoholic liquor, especially rum diluted with water [31]


[edit] guillotine

GIL-uh-teen, GEE-uh-teen

noun

Etymology

The guillotine was devised by a physician, Joseph Guillotin, during the French Revolution and was used as the official method of execution in France until the twentieth century. [32]

Definition

A machine with a large, falling knife blade designed for beheading people quickly and with minimal pain [33]


[edit] guinea

GIN-ee

noun

Etymology

a derogatory term for Italian (1896) was originally Guinea Negro (1740s) and meant "black person, person of mixed ancestry." It was applied to Italians c.1890 probably because of their dark complexions relative to northern Europeans, and after 1911 was occasionally applied to Hispanics and Pacific Islanders as well. [34]

Definition

an offensive term for a person of Italian descent [35]


[edit] gum arabic

GUM AIR-uh-bik

noun

Etymology

The substance is harvested commercially from wild trees throughout the Sahel from Senegal and Sudan to Somalia, although it has been historically cultivated in Arabia and West Asia [36]

Definition

a water-soluble gum obtained from several acacias (especially Acacia senegal) and used especially in the manufacture of inks, adhesives, pharmaceuticals, and confections [37]


[edit] gung ho

GUNG HOH

adjective

Etymology

1942, from Mandarin Chinese gōnghé, short for Zhōngguó Gōngyè Hézuò Shè Chinese Industrial Cooperative Society [38]

Definition

extremely or overly zealous or enthusiastic [39]

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