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[edit] earth

URTH

noun

Etymology

from Earth, the third planet from the sun [1]

Definition

the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface [2]


[edit] eclogue

ECK-log

Etymology

from Latin Eclogae, title of Virgil's pastorals, literally, selections [3]

Definition

a poem in which shepherds converse [4]


[edit] egad

ee-GAD

interjection

Etymology

1673, probably a euphemism for oh God [5]

Definition;

used as a mild oath [6]


[edit] eolian

ee-OH-lee-un

adjective

Etymology

relating to Aeolus, god of the winds [7]

Definition

borne, deposited, produced, or eroded by the wind [8]

When Aeolus blew into town, things really got moving. He was the Greek god of the winds and the king of the floating island of Aeolia. In the Odyssey, Homer claims Aeolus helped Odysseus by giving him a favorable wind. Aeolus also gave English speakers a few terms based on his name, including "eolian" (also spelled "aeolian"), an adjective often used for wind-sculpted geological features such as caves and dunes, and "aeolian harp," an instrument that makes music when the wind blows across its strings.


[edit] epicure

EH-pih-kyur

noun

Etymology

c.1380, from Epicurus, an Athenian philosopher who taught that pleasure is the highest good and identified virtue as the greatest pleasure [9]

Definition
  1. a person with refined taste, especially in food and wine
  2. a person devoted to sensuous pleasure and luxurious living [10]


[edit] espiègle

es-PYEGL

noun

Etymology

A corruption of "Ulespiegle," the French name for Till Eulenspiegel, a peasant prankster of German folklore. Tales of Eulenspiegel's merry pranks against well-to-do townsmen, clergy, and nobility were first translated into French in 1532 and into English around 1560. In the 19th century, Sir Walter Scott introduced his readers to the adjective "espiègle" and the related noun "espièglerie" (a word for "roguishness" or "playfulness") in his Waverley novels. Other 19th century authors followed suit, and even today these words are most likely to be encountered in literature. [11]

Definition
  1. frolicsome
  2. roguish [12]


[edit] euphuism

YOO-fyuh-wiz-um

noun

Etymology

John Lyly employed this verbose form of rhetoric in his prose works Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1578) and Euphues and His England (1580). Euphuism comes from the name of the character Euphues, whom Lyly described as a "young gallante, of more wit then wealth, and yet of more wealth then wisdome." The name was probably inspired by a Greek word meaning "witty." [13]

Definition
  1. an elegant Elizabethan literary style marked by excessive use of balance, antithesis, and alliteration and by frequent use of similes drawn from mythology and nature
  2. artificial elegance of language [14]
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