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[edit] daedal

DEE-dul

adjective

Etymology

after the mythical Greek craftsman and inventor, Daedalus, noted especially for the construction of a labyrinth to contain the Minotaur and for the invention of wings with which he and his son Icarus escaped imprisonment [1]

Definition
  1. skillful, artistic
  2. intricate
  3. adorned with many things [2]


[edit] dago

DAE-go

noun

Etymology

1823, from Spanish Diego James, originally used to refer to Spanish or Portuguese sailors on English or American ships. By 1900 it had broadened to include non-sailors and shifted to mean chiefly Italian. [3]

Definition

a person of Italian or Spanish birth or descent (usually offensive) [4]


[edit] daltonism

DAHL-tuh-NIZ-um

noun

Etymology

19th century, from French daltonisme, named after the UK scientist John Dalton (1766-1844), who described his own symptoms. [5]

Defintion

An inherited defect in perception of red and green; red-green colorblindness [6]


[edit] danegeld

DAYN-gheld

noun

Etymology

the subjects of King Ethelred II, who ruled England from 978-1016, didn’t think much of the ruler they dubbed “the Unready.” They suspected him of murdering his brother to gain the throne, so it isn't surprising that they didn't rally around him to defend the country against the Danish invaders who attempted to unseat him. Ethelred tried a payoff tax called the Danegeld as a last ditch effort to keep his kingdom intact. [7]

Definition

annual tax believed to have been imposed originally to buy off Danish invaders in England or to maintain forces to oppose them but continued as a land tax [8]

often capitalized


[edit] danish

DAE-nish

noun

Etymology

from Danish, of or relating to or characteristic of Denmark or the Danes [9]

Definition

a type of cake for one person, consisting of sweet pastry, often with fruit inside [10]


[edit] delphic

DEL-fick

adjective

Etymology

from the oracle of Delphi, the fabled home of a shrine to the Greek god of music, poetry, and prophecy, Apollo [11]

Definition
  1. of or relating to Delphi or to the oracles of Apollo at Delphi; "Delphic oracle"
  2. obscurely prophetic [12]


[edit] denim

DE-nim

noun

Etymology: French serge de Nîmes; serge of Nîmes, France [13]

Definition
  1. a firm durable twilled usually cotton fabric woven with colored warp and white filling threads
  2. a similar fabric woven in colored stripes
  3. (plural) overalls or trousers usually of blue denim [14]


[edit] derringer

DARE-un-jer

noun

Etymology

1850, for Henry Deringer (1786-1868), U.S. gunsmith who invented it in the 1840s [15]

Definition
  1. a short-barreled pocket pistol [16]
  2. a small pistol with a large bore, very effective at short range [17]


[edit] diesel

DEE-zul

noun

Etymology

1894, named for Rudolf Diesel (1858-1913), Ger. mechanical engineer who designed this type of engine [18]

Definition

an internal combustion engine in which air is compressed to a temperature sufficiently high to ignite fuel injected into the cylinder where the combustion and expansion actuate a piston [19]


[edit] donnybrook

DAH-nee-brook

noun

Etymology

After Donnybrook fair, held annually in Donnybrook, a suburb of Dublin, Ireland, and noted for its brawls [20]

Definition
  1. a free-for-all
  2. a brawl
  3. a usually public quarrel or dispute [21]


[edit] draconian

dra-KOH-nee-yun

adjective

1876 (earlier Draconic, 1680), from Draco, Greek statesman who laid down a code of laws for Athens in 621 B.C.E. that mandated death as punishment for minor crimes. His name seems to mean literally "sharp-sighted" [22]

Definition

extremely severe; especially of a rule, law, or punishment [23]


[edit] dutch

DUTCH

adverb

Etymology

During the 17th century, the British and the Dutch became bitter rivals in international commerce. As the competition heated up, so did the invectives. One of the earliest verbal abuses directed at the Dutch was the term "Dutch bargain," penned in 1654 to describe a bargain made and sealed as if while drinking. "Dutch courage" (courage artificially stimulated especially by drink), "Dutch uncle" (one who admonishes sternly and bluntly), and "in Dutch" (in disfavor or trouble) are some more examples. The Dutch were also vilified as greedy. Hence, when you're invited to a dutch treat, you're expected to pay your own way. By the 20th century, "dutch" and "dutch treat" were being used as adverbs meaning "with each person paying his or her own way." [24]

Definition

with each person paying his or her own way [25]

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