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[edit] aeolian

ae-OH-lee-un

See eolian


[edit] algorithm

AL-guh-ri-thum

noun

Etymology

1699, from French algorithme refashioned (under mistaken connection with Greek arithmos "number") from Middle Latin algorismus, a mangled transliteration of Arabic al-Khwarizmi "native of Khwarazm," surname of the mathematician whose works introduced sophisticated mathematics to the West. [1]

Definition
  1. procedure for solving a mathematical problem (as of finding the greatest common divisor) in a finite number of steps that frequently involves repetition of an operation; broadly
  2. a step-by-step procedure for solving a problem or accomplishing some end especially by a computer [2]


[edit] amontillado

a-MON-ti-YA-do

noun

Etymology

1825, from Spanish, "from Montilla," name of a town in the province of Cordova, Spain. [3]

Definition

a pale dry sherry [4]


[edit] ampere

am-PEER

noun

Etymology

Named for André-Marie Ampère (1775-1836) who was the first to recognize that there is a direction for the flow of an electric current and to introduce a convention for determining that direction. [5]

Definition
  1. A unit of electric current in the meter-kilogram-second system. It is the steady current that when flowing in straight parallel wires of infinite length and negligible cross section, separated by a distance of one meter in free space, produces a force between the wires of 2 × 10-7 newtons per meter of length.
  2. A unit in the International System specified as one International coulomb per second and equal to 0.999835 ampere. [6]


[edit] anecdote

AN-ik-doht

noun

Etymology

The Byzantine official Procopius wrote three historical works in Greek. In the first two, he dealt with wars and public works projects, but the third was something of a departure from this kind of history. Referred to as Anekdota, from the Greek "a-" meaning "not," and "ekdidonai," meaning "to publish," it contained bitter attacks on the emperor Justinian, his wife, and other notables of contemporary Constantinople. Understandably, it was not published until after its writer's death. English speakers originally used an anglicized version of the book's name for similar secret or unpublished histories or biographies, and by the 17th century, the meaning had been broadened to cover any interesting or amusing personal tale. [7]

Definition

a usually short narrative of an interesting, amusing, or biographical incident [8]


[edit] antimacassar

an-tee-muh-KASS-er

noun

Etymology

after Macassar, a kind of hair oil formerly used by men, represented as consisting of ingredients from Makassar, the former name for the seaport of Ujung Pandang in Indonesia [9]

Definition

a piece of cloth put over the back of a chair to protect it from grease and dirt [10]


[edit] aphrodisiac

af-ruh-DEE-zee-ak

noun

Etymology

From Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love

Definition

Aphrodisiacs are substances (including food or drink) that are purported to arouse or increase sexual desire. Among the most widely touted aphrodisiacs are caviar, frog legs, oysters and truffles and, of course, one's imagination. [11]


[edit] arcadia

ar-KAY-dee-uh

noun

Etymology

Arcadia is a mountainous, landlocked region of Greece. The Roman poet Virgil recognized that Arcadia's isolation and bucolic character make it a perfect setting for pastoral poetry, and over the centuries many other writers have agreed. In the poems of Arcadia, naive and ideal innocence is often unaffected by the passions of the larger world. Shepherds play their pipes and sigh with longing for flirtatious nymphs; shepherdesses sing to their flocks; and goat-footed nature gods cavort in the fields and woods. [12]

Definition
a region or scene of simple pleasure and quiet [13]


[edit] argosy

AHR-guh-see

noun

Etymology

Argosy comes from Arragosa, the English name for the city that is now Dubrovnik, Croatia. Over time, the Italian name of the town, Ragusa, was gradually modified into a noun for the laden merchant ships that sailed from that port in medieval days, and later still into one denoting any merchant vessel or rich store. [14]

Definition
  1. a large merchant ship
  2. a fleet of ships [15]


[edit] argyle

AHR-gile

adjective

Etymology

After Clan Campbell of Argyll, a former county of western Scotland, originally from the pattern of their tartan. [16]

Definition
  1. a pattern of diamond-shaped areas on a solid background; used especially of knitwear
  2. a sock having this pattern


[edit] ascot (tie)

AS-cot

Etymology;

Ascot Heath, racetrack near Ascot, England Date: 1898

Definition
a broad neck scarf that is looped under the chin [17]

[edit] atlas

AT-luss

Etymology

First used in 1636 in reference to the Englist translation of Atlas, sive cosmographicae meditationes de fabrica mundi (1585) by Flemish geographer Gerhardus Mercator (1512-94), who may have been the first to use this word in this way. A picture of the Titan Atlas holding up the world appeared on the frontispiece. [18]

Definition

a collection of maps in a volume [19]

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